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source ways to care for the planet and her people
ways to care for the planet and her people

“[Sustainability] is personal. It is about every day, ordinary choices that have an extraordinary impact on the world.”

- Bandana Tewari

If we all examine our everyday choices, our seemingly small actions can collectively have a huge impact on the planet and her people. Today, fashion is the second-most polluting industry in the world. Our sartorial decisions contribute to 20-35% of micro-plastic flows in the ocean and have placed an immense strain on water supplies in China, Central Asia and India. Garment workers remain among the lowest-paid people in the world, many of whom are women who do not have adequate rights and freedoms.

In tandem with a growing number of fashion brands who have chosen to strive towards greater sustainability, we, too, can play our part as individuals or by rallying our communities to rethink our consumption behaviour. With this in mind, the team at SOURCE have thought of five simple steps that we could adopt in our lives to save the earth and mankind.

 

1. Buy less and better

Conscious consumption tends to constitute us buying less, but this could also mean looking out for versatile pieces that can be worn in manifold ways and used for multiple occasions. A seemingly basic t-shirt, for example, could pair equally well with a shimmering high-waisted skirt or a pair of distressed jeans. This contributes to us needing lesser staples in our closet.

Besides reducing the number of products we purchase, let’s think deeply about materiality, fit and the company’s manifesto before making a purchase. It is important for us look beyond the price tag, but peer deeper into the make-up of the fabric (e.g. 100% organic cotton vs polyester-cotton blends) and what the brand stands for. There are today many alternatives to standard materials, which translates to longer-lasting garments and greater comfort.

  1.  
  2. 2. Care for your clothing

As time-starved individuals, most of us would simply throw our laundry into the washing machine and the dryer after. Yet, simple tweaks made to care for our clothing could go a long way. For instance, washing in lower temperatures would help preserve your garment’s sheen and using a laundry bag protects the hardware of your items. Uncovering and understanding the material better could also prove useful in maximising the longevity of the fabric. TENCEL™, for example, should not be wrung or twisted as best as possible, and air-drying it flat on a drying rack instead of a hanger is preferred.

 

“[Sustainability] is personal. It is about every day, ordinary choices that have an extraordinary impact on the world.”

- Bandana Tewari

garment care guide source

If we all examine our everyday choices, our seemingly small actions can collectively have a huge impact on the planet and her people. Today, fashion is the second-most polluting industry in the world. Our sartorial decisions contribute to 20-35% of micro-plastic flows in the ocean and have placed an immense strain on water supplies in China, Central Asia and India. Garment workers remain among the lowest-paid people in the world, many of whom are women who do not have adequate rights and freedoms.

In tandem with a growing number of fashion brands who have chosen to strive towards greater sustainability, we, too, can play our part as individuals or by rallying our communities to rethink our consumption behaviour. With this in mind, the team at SOURCE have thought of five simple steps that we could adopt in our lives to save the earth and mankind.

 

1. Buy less and better

Conscious consumption tends to constitute us buying less, but this could also mean looking out for versatile pieces that can be worn in manifold ways and used for multiple occasions. A seemingly basic t-shirt, for example, could pair equally well with a shimmering high-waisted skirt or a pair of distressed jeans. This contributes to us needing lesser staples in our closet.

Besides reducing the number of products we purchase, let’s think deeply about materiality, fit and the company’s manifesto before making a purchase. It is important for us look beyond the price tag, but peer deeper into the make-up of the fabric (e.g. 100% organic cotton vs polyester-cotton blends) and what the brand stands for. There are today many alternatives to standard materials, which translates to longer-lasting garments and greater comfort.

  1.  
  2. 2. Care for your clothing

As time-starved individuals, most of us would simply throw our laundry into the washing machine and the dryer after. Yet, simple tweaks made to care for our clothing could go a long way. For instance, washing in lower temperatures would help preserve your garment’s sheen and using a laundry bag protects the hardware of your items. Uncovering and understanding the material better could also prove useful in maximising the longevity of the fabric. TENCEL™, for example, should not be wrung or twisted as best as possible, and air-drying it flat on a drying rack instead of a hanger is preferred.

Check out our Garment Care Guide on how your favourite pieces can last longer.

  1.  
  2. 3. Finding new owners or uses

Aside from donating your pre-loved clothes to Salvation Army, there are a variety of options when finding new wardrobes for items that no longer suit you. You could consider selling your clothing to businesses who deal with second-hand fashion, such as REFASH, or swap your pre-loved pieces at The Fashion Pulpit.

In addition, you could keep a lookout for smaller local charity organisations who take in clothes and items that you’re keen to give away. For example, you can donate your clothing to The Singapore Council of Women’s Organisations’ thrift shop, and The Humanitarian Organisation of Migrant Economics accepts household items (e.g. toiletries and detergent) and electronics (e.g. laptops) for migrant workers who live in their shelters as a result of abuse.

  1.  
  2. 4. Support local businesses

In Singapore, there is a burgeoning crop of homegrown makers and entrepreneurs — spanning a multitude of disciplines — who are creating well-designed products. Choosing to support them is not merely more sustainable (cutting down on transportation-related pollution and resource depletion), it also means you’re personally investing in your community and neighbourhood.

Ultimately, in supporting these local talents, you’re playing a part in fostering the next generation of creators. These independent start-ups challenge a world that is replete with soulless chains, repetitive box stores and sterile retail environments. The survival of these local businesses shall determine the vibrancy and dynamism of the cities we live in.

  1.  
  2. 5. Look out for ethical brands

Following the 2013 collapse of the Dhaka garment factory which killed 1,134 persons, ethical fashion came to the fore, highlighting issues like low wages and unsafe working conditions for employees. We should all stand behind brands that are transparent with their business operations, from factory conditions to fabric suppliers. These practices are crucial in ensuring that the underprivileged are not taken advantaged of and shines a light on pressing matters surrounding ethical fashion.

 

garment care guide

Check out our Garment Care Guide on how your favourite pieces can last longer.

Read our garment care guide on how you can have your favourite pieces last longer.

  1. 3. Finding new owners or uses

Aside from donating your pre-loved clothes to Salvation Army, there are a variety of options when finding new wardrobes for items that no longer suit you. You could consider selling your clothing to businesses who deal with second-hand fashion, such as REFASH, or swap your pre-loved pieces at The Fashion Pulpit.

In addition, you could keep a lookout for smaller local charity organisations who take in clothes and items that you’re keen to give away. For example, you can donate your clothing to The Singapore Council of Women’s Organisations’ thrift shop, and The Humanitarian Organisation of Migrant Economics accepts household items (e.g. toiletries and detergent) and electronics (e.g. laptops) for migrant workers who live in their shelters as a result of abuse.

  1.  
  2. 4. Support local businesses

In Singapore, there is a burgeoning crop of homegrown makers and entrepreneurs — spanning a multitude of disciplines — who are creating well-designed products. Choosing to support them is not merely more sustainable (cutting down on transportation-related pollution and resource depletion), it also means you’re personally investing in your community and neighbourhood.

Ultimately, in supporting these local talents, you’re playing a part in fostering the next generation of creators. These independent start-ups challenge a world that is replete with soulless chains, repetitive box stores and sterile retail environments. The survival of these local businesses shall determine the vibrancy and dynamism of the cities we live in.

  1.  
  2. 5. Look out for ethical brands

Following the 2013 collapse of the Dhaka garment factory which killed 1,134 persons, ethical fashion came to the fore, highlighting issues like low wages and unsafe working conditions for employees. We should all stand behind brands that are transparent with their business operations, from factory conditions to fabric suppliers. These practices are crucial in ensuring that the underprivileged are not taken advantaged of and shines a light on pressing matters surrounding ethical fashion.

 

It definitely takes a village to care for Gaia and her people. Let’s all take a humble step towards sustainable and ethical consumption today.

source ethical manufacturing

It definitely takes a village to care for Gaia and her people. Let’s all take a humble step towards sustainable and ethical consumption today.

Read our garment care guide on how you can have your favourite pieces last longer.

  1.  
  2. 3. Finding new owners or uses

Aside from donating your pre-loved clothes to Salvation Army, there are a variety of options when finding new wardrobes for items that no longer suit you. You could consider selling your clothing to businesses who deal with second-hand fashion, such as REFASH, or swap your pre-loved pieces at The Fashion Pulpit.

In addition, you could keep a lookout for smaller local charity organisations who take in clothes and items that you’re keen to give away. For example, you can donate your clothing to The Singapore Council of Women’s Organisations’ thrift shop, and The Humanitarian Organisation of Migrant Economics accepts household items (e.g. toiletries and detergent) and electronics (e.g. laptops) for migrant workers who live in their shelters as a result of abuse.

  1.  
  2. 4. Support local businesses

In Singapore, there is a burgeoning crop of homegrown makers and entrepreneurs — spanning a multitude of disciplines — who are creating well-designed products. Choosing to support them is not merely more sustainable (cutting down on transportation-related pollution and resource depletion), it also means you’re personally investing in your community and neighbourhood.

Ultimately, in supporting these local talents, you’re playing a part in fostering the next generation of creators. These independent start-ups challenge a world that is replete with soulless chains, repetitive box stores and sterile retail environments. The survival of these local businesses shall determine the vibrancy and dynamism of the cities we live in.

  1.  
  2. 5. Look out for ethical brands

Following the 2013 collapse of the Dhaka garment factory which killed 1,134 persons, ethical fashion came to the fore, highlighting issues like low wages and unsafe working conditions for employees. We should all stand behind brands that are transparent with their business operations, from factory conditions to fabric suppliers. These practices are crucial in ensuring that the underprivileged are not taken advantaged of and shines a light on pressing matters surrounding ethical fashion.

source ethical manufacturing

It definitely takes a village to care for Gaia and her people. Let’s all take a humble step towards sustainable and ethical consumption today.

It definitely takes a village to care for Gaia and her people. Let’s all take a humble step towards sustainable and ethical consumption today.